Chemical Dependency Specialist in Criminal Justice (SC)

People in graduation gowns

Help People in the Criminal Justice System Overcome Chemical Dependency

Statistically, people who are within the criminal justice system are more likely to have chemical dependency and mental health issues than the general population. Being a Chemical Dependency Specialist who works within the confines of the criminal justice system has another added component to work with when helping a client recover. 

Working as a Chemical Dependency Specialist, you will not only need to know the intricacies of how to your client, you will also need to understand your client’s legal matters and the outcomes the judicial system is hoping to see through the treatment plan. In addition to treating your client for chemical dependency, you may also be asked to help with their case management. While this can be a very challenging career working with people during a time when they are most exposed, it is also an extremely rewarding and fulfilling one.

Careers as a Chemical Dependency Specialist within the Criminal Justice System

Counselors advocating for and supporting those within the criminal justice system with chemical dependencies, as well as working with detectives, attorneys, defendants, judges, and others within the legal system.

Here are a few careers and their salaries you could have with a certificate in Chemical Dependency Specialist:

Career information below taken from bls.gov November 2019. Go to bls.gov for most current career information.

Assist in rehabilitation of law offenders in custody or on probation or parole.

Data for Los Angeles/Long Beach/Anaheim

Typical Education Level: Salary: Hourly Median Wage:
Bachelor’s Degree $85,470/year $41.09/hour
Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Job Outlook 2018-2028: Number of Jobs 2018:
None needed
4% increase
(as fast as average)
5,210

Provide treatment and advise people who suffer from alcoholism, drug addiction, or other mental or behavioral problems.

Data for Los Angeles/Long Beach/Anaheim

Typical Education Level: Salary: Hourly Median Wage:
Bachelor’s degree $50,650/year
$24.35/hour
Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Job Outlook 2018-2028: Number of Jobs 2018:
None needed 5% increase
(as fast as average) 
12,630

Provide client services in a variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, and social work.

Data for Los Angeles/Long Beach/Anaheim

Typical Education Level: Salary: Hourly Median Wage:
High school diploma or equivalent $42,160/year $20.27/hour
Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Job Outlook 2018-2028: Number of Jobs 2018:
None needed 5% increase
(as fast as average)
19,070
 

Assess and treat individuals with mental, emotional, or substance abuse problems, including abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and/or other drugs. Activities may include individual and group therapy, crisis intervention, case management, client advocacy, prevention, and education.

Data for Los Angeles/Long Beach/Anaheim

Typical Education Level: Salary: Hourly Median Wage:
Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work $61,570/year $29.60/hour
Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Job Outlook 2018-2028: Number of Jobs 2018:
None needed 5% increase
(as fast as average)
5,670

What You’ll Learn at LASC to be a Chemical Dependency Specialist

You can get a Skill Certificate in Chemical Dependency Counselor where you will develop the academic theories and skills on how to counsel those with chemical dependencies who are in the criminal justice system:

  • Become aware of theories and methods of how to assist individuals in the criminal justice system with chemical dependency, and ways to help both the individual and their family through the process of change.
  • Discover the principles behind intervention, treatment, and recovery issues in chemical dependency, what the stages of formal intervention are, along with the obstacles that might be faced while in the criminal justice system. 
  • Become familiar with what the appropriate procedures are in a clinical setting, like the initial interviewing processes and treatment planning, to ensure you are giving the best care while ensuring professional boundaries.
  • LASC provides internships so you can build your career connections and create community ties for after you graduate.
  • Want to transfer? If you want to get your bachelor’s degree in social work or another related subject, talk with your academic counselor about what you would need to do to transfer to a four-year university or college.

 

Degrees & Courses You Will Take 

Review LASC’s Skill Certificate in Chemical Dependency Specialist in Criminal Justice below along with our suggested course of study for this program. Go to LASC’s current Course Catalog for specific course information:

Major Code: 2104.42

Total Units Required: 15

Upon completion of this programs, students will be able to: 

  • Discuss, describe, and demonstrate the intake/initial interviewing process in a criminal justice setting. 
  • Discuss, describe, and demonstrate the treatment planning process in a criminal justice setting. 
Required Courses: Units
ADM JUS 1 Introduction to Administration of Justice 3
ADM JUS 75 Introduction to Corrections  3
PSYCH 64 Introduction to Drug and Alcohol Abuse  
     (ADDICST 1 Understanding Addiction and Counseling)
3
PSYCH 65 Chemical Dependency: Intervention, Treatment & Recovery 3 
     (ADDICST 7 Addiction Treatment and Recovery)
3
PSYCH 67 Counseling Techniques for Chemically Addicted
     (ADDICST 4 Clinical Counseling Laws and Ethics) 
3
TOTAL UNITS 15

Get Ready Before You Start 

Interested in a career in counseling those with chemical dependency? Before your first class starts at LASC, you can begin to prepare for your career:

  • Make an appointment with your LASC academic counselor to review LASC’s program, start to develop a Student Education Plan (SEP), and discuss your career goals to learn about support services and other opportunities that you could benefit from while at LASC.
  • Still in high school? Look for opportunities to volunteer and make positive impacts in your community. Talk with your high school counselor to see if there are opportunities to intern at local nonprofits or shadow someone for the day. Look for summer opportunities in your local community service organizations where you can learn more and gain more experience in your future career.

 

Program Learning Outcomes

As a student, upon successfully completing this program, you will be able to:

  • Discuss, describe, and demonstrate the intake/initial interviewing process in a criminal justice setting. 
  • Discuss, describe, and demonstrate the treatment planning process in a criminal justice setting.